Tag Archives: word bites

The Jam D I Hughes

A musical interlude: English Rose

The Jam are one of the UK’s greatest musical exports.

In just five years, this furious three-piece went from playing working men’s clubs, pubs and various dives in Woking, Surrey (their home town) and London to becoming one of the most defining band’s in music history.

Many of Paul Weller’s lyrics possess a kind of aggressive urgency, yet each and everyone of them are as astute as they are poetic.

If you’re tired and stressed, take a load off and listen to English Rose. Kick back and let the haunting simplicity of these romantic words wash over you – you’ll feel better for it… Continue reading

Words

The Power of Words: Cardboard Stories

Words are a powerful thing.

To demonstrate the power of words and how they can make us feel, I’d like to share this video put together by Rethink Homelessness.

Recently, a group of homeless people in Orlando Florida were each asked to write down a personal or interesting fact about themselves and show it to the camera, and it’s fair to say the the results is pretty amazing…

So there you have it: The Power of Words in action.

Keep your eyes peeled for more from this series over the coming months.

What do words mean to you? Let us know by leaving a comment.

Image: David Blackwell via Flickr

Origins of Words Catchy Content Writing

Word Bites: Where Did the Word Posh Come From?

For the second in this mini series, quite suitably named ‘Word Bites’, I’d like to touch upon the uncertain origins of the word posh.

Now, there are a fair few theories based around where this particular word  found its place in the wonderful world of vocabulary, and actually, there is no definitive answer.

Definition

n. The quality of being elegant, stylish, or upper class

Where did the word posh come from? As I said before, no one really knows for sure, but in the general spirit of fact, fiction, tale telling, debate and interpretation, here is my favourite explanation…

In 1920’s – 1930’s, wealthy, well-to-do passengers travelling by boat between England and India used to have abbreviation POSH clearly written against their bookings, which stood for ‘Port Out, Starboard Home‘ (basically the best possible place to be situated during a nautical journey).

As a result, this implication weaved its way into the English language as a way of identifying someone who is partial too and can afford the finer things in life – essentially someone of ‘upper class’.

posh origins of words

Although this particular theory has its flaws, I personally like it as in my head, it conjures a great deal of classic sea faring imagery – and this alone represents to me, the power of words.

So there you have it, my personal take on the word posh. This may not change your life, however, I do hope it has entertained you for a few moments- thanks for reading.

What do you think the word posh came from?

Image: Movie Stars and Rockets via Flickr

Origins of Words Catchy Content Writing

Word Bites: The Hazy Origin of Assassin

Words are essential.

Having an extensive and let’s say colourful vocabulary means that we are able to express ourselves in a whole host of different ways – and if you’re a writer, the more words you know, the more potent you can be. But do we ever consider where many of the words we use originated?

This mini blog series aptly named ‘Word Bites’ will concentrate on a different word in each episode, giving a brief insight into how it came to light. There’s no real method to the words I’ll be selecting over the coming months, in fact it will be completely random – just to mix things up a little.

So, without further ado, the first word (as you may have gathered from the title) on my ‘list’ is assassin.

Assassins content writing

Definition:

n. Murderer, generally somewhat professional; esp. one who murders a prominent figure.

Origin:

During the times of the crusade, members of a particular top secret Muslim sect bound people to terrorise their Christian enemies by performing organised murders as a form of religious duty.

Generally, these rather brutal yet calculated acts were carried out under the influence of hashish, and subsequently, these killers become known as hashashins, meaning the eaters or smokers of hash. Eventually, this term was shortened and over time, evolved into the term assassin.

There you have it, the origins or the word assassin. Although you may not use it in every day speech, it might make you look at assassins in a whole new way!

Keep an eye out for the next episode of ‘Word Bites’ and if you need any words written for your website, feel free to get in touch.

Images: Steven Feather and Niranjan via Flickr